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On asking me to call a ceilidh... - Sally's Journal
June 6th, 2012
10:19 am

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On asking me to call a ceilidh...

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From:robert_jones
Date:June 6th, 2012 11:18 am (UTC)
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It really isn't that hard. I used to do it with money I made from playing the organ: you just fill in a box saying you made £X from casual income, and put a note to say that it is from occasionally calling ceilidhs. I would just not claim any expenses: the worst that will happen is that you'll pay more tax than you need to.
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From:atreic
Date:June 6th, 2012 11:45 am (UTC)
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Surely I could avoid the expenses question by, eg, if I was paid 50 quid to call a ceilidh and also given 41.23 for the cost of my train ticket, just putting 50 quid in the box? Or would that be Bad for some reason?
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From:robert_jones
Date:June 6th, 2012 03:03 pm (UTC)
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Well, yes, it would be a fraud. The correct position is that you have informal income of 91.23, with associated expenses of 41.23. You're not under any obligation to declare the expenses, but you are obliged to declare the full amount of the income.
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From:atreic
Date:June 6th, 2012 03:09 pm (UTC)
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If someone gives me 30 quid as a wedding present, is that informal income? I have hazy ideas that if it's a Huge Gift, and they die within n years, then it's a problem and I have to declare it. But that generally people can just give me money as a present and that's OK?

They really ought to teach this kind of thing in schools...
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From:robert_jones
Date:June 6th, 2012 03:13 pm (UTC)
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Gifts are non-taxable. You are right that if the gift is over a certain threshold (£1000 for wedding presents and £250 otherwise), and the donor dies within 7 years, inheritance tax could potentially be due.

Edited at 2012-07-26 07:30 pm (UTC)
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