?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Poll #1144016… - Sally's Journal
February 25th, 2008
10:47 am

[Link]

Previous Entry Share Next Entry

The most famous obscenity trial of a book or film is

But other ones worth considering (if, for example, I was doing a later tickybox poll) are...



[ETA yes, plays count too. I don't know why I forgot to put it in the poll. Any obscenity trial about Art, really]

(18 comments | Leave a comment)

Comments
 
[User Picture]
From:half_of_monty
Date:February 25th, 2008 10:57 am (UTC)
(Link)
PS The Romans in Britain was the Mary Whitehouse one, and is indeed a play.
[User Picture]
From:bugshaw
Date:February 25th, 2008 10:59 am (UTC)
(Link)
This is like Family Fortunes! "We asked our studio audience to name a famous obscenity trial."
[User Picture]
From:atreic
Date:February 25th, 2008 11:03 am (UTC)
(Link)
Our survey says... EH-OH (I can't write down that noise. Eh-oh makes it look like the tellitubbies...)
[User Picture]
From:gerald_duck
Date:February 25th, 2008 11:15 am (UTC)
(Link)
You need to be writing it in a language where pitch is significant.

Incidentally, looking at the poll responses, how come so few people can spell "Chatterley" correctly?
[User Picture]
From:lavendersparkle
Date:February 25th, 2008 12:42 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Because they were over confident in their spelling ability and therefore did not look it up on Google (as I did). Although know that I think about it I didn't need to look it up on Google as a D. H. Lawrence anthology is part of my pile of books to get my monitor to the ergonomically correct level.
[User Picture]
From:emperor
Date:February 25th, 2008 01:19 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Or too lazy to check the spelling when I realised I couldn't spell it properly!
From:neonchameleon
Date:February 25th, 2008 01:41 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Because there's only AFAIK one famous libel case that can be referred to with the words Lady Ch*t*l*y (where * can be anything) and so we were too lazy to look it up given that what was written was unambiguous? And most people seem to have got it right anyway.
[User Picture]
From:robert_jones
Date:February 29th, 2008 08:30 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Actually I was just thinking it was surprising how many people could spell it correctly.
[User Picture]
From:gerald_duck
Date:February 29th, 2008 09:17 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Mmm. After I posted that comment, suddenly people started being able to spell it correctly. I responded to the poll at about the same time so you can see the before-and-after spread of spellings. (-8
[User Picture]
From:midnightmelody
Date:February 25th, 2008 11:19 am (UTC)
(Link)
One of my teacher-friends uses that as a catchphrase (unless being observed by humourless people).
[User Picture]
From:geekette8
Date:February 25th, 2008 11:10 am (UTC)
(Link)
[User Picture]
From:pozorvlak
Date:February 25th, 2008 11:32 am (UTC)
(Link)
The Story of O would also be worth considering. I note that the Marquis de Sade was never tried, but rather imprisoned by royal (and later imperial) fiat.
[User Picture]
From:keirf
Date:February 25th, 2008 12:01 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I assume poetry counts too. Although in the "other considerations" I put an obscenity trial concerning live comedy.

Without looking at the answers by others I bet they're mostly focussed on British obscenity trials.
[User Picture]
From:cartesiandaemon
Date:February 25th, 2008 12:28 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I felt sure I must be able to give an amusing answer about an ancient greek's trial, but couldn't think of one :(
[User Picture]
From:makyo
Date:February 25th, 2008 12:30 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Is this the sort of thread you would want your wife or servants to read?

I remember seeing, on a documentary a few years ago, a news item about the Lady Chatterley trial. The reporter spoke to a number of people queueing outside a bookshop to buy a copy of the newly-legal unexpurgated version of the text. One was an elderly lady, who said "well I disagree strongly with censorship of art and literature, so I'm proud to be buying a copy of this important book, on principle". The next were two university students, who said "We're studying Lawrence this term and thought we should get copies of the full text, so we can see what the author actually wrote". Finally, the interviewer turned to the next person in the queue, a middle-aged gentleman in a long coat, and asked "And you, sir, why are you buying a copy?"

The accosted gentleman turned away from the camera, shielded his face with his hand, and mumbled "No, sorry, not today".

It's often struck me that this was completely the worst approach to take. Had he said something like "because I'm fifty-two years old, and I'm old enough to decide myself what I should and shouldn't read" or even just "I thought I'd see what all the fuss was about" then that'd have been fine. But as it was, he was captured on film, and broadcast to the nation, as a dodgy old bloke in a crumpled raincoat.

("Who needs a hobby like tennis or philately? I've got a hobby: rereading Lady Chatterley.")
[User Picture]
From:gerald_duck
Date:February 25th, 2008 01:59 pm (UTC)
(Link)
He should have said "because I like the word 'fuck'" and gambled the interview would therefore be unusable.
From:mooism
Date:February 25th, 2008 01:24 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Ugh, I’m so uncultured :-\
[User Picture]
From:sashajwolf
Date:February 25th, 2008 04:04 pm (UTC)
(Link)
You might want to widen it to include blasphemy trials, so that you can have Mary Whitehouse -v- Gay Times in there.
Powered by LiveJournal.com